Web Design Tip: How the Halo Effect Influences Website Visitors

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During web design Essex, Halo Effect is a term that comes from working in field of social psychology. It explains how initial impression of a person (for example, she is sympathetic) may have a cascade effect that may affect other beliefs we have about that person (e.g., she is intelligent). In human resources recruitment refers to the risk of an interviewer being influenced by a positive trait of a respondent, and thus not having to choose the correct candidate for a post.

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The effect of halo on business and politics

The commercial benefits of the halo effect are well known in the business world and, whether you realize it or not, the Halo impacts our lives on a daily basis. Books that have an endorsement of “Harvard Classics” on the cover can sell for double the price of an unendorsed version. Adding the name of a famous stylist to the ubiquitous T-shirt can inflate your price dramatically. It is not just politicians kissing babies, who are associated with pop and movie stars for the positive bias of personality to fall on them.

The halo effect and Apple

The “halo effect” and Apple are synonymous since the company introduced the iPod. Customers who buy an iPod become addicted to product functionality and ease of use quickly, this positive trend extends to other Macintosh products and many people are tempted to Mac platform when their existing PC needs replaced.

Website design Halo effect

“A web site has only 1/20 second to capture the interest of potential clients”, said executive of SEO company Essex. In the blink of an eye, before you have had time to read a word on your site, find out your USP or be motivated by your call to action, site visitors are making close to instant judgments about your company in visual appeal base of your site.

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About Susan Davis
Susan Devis is a social media enthusiast and marketing visionary who was named ‘2012: 25 Women Who Rock Social Media’ by TopRank Marketing Blog. Follow at Google + | Twitter